The resolution will not be televised…

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At the end of a year and the beginning of a new one we’re culturally encouraged, almost expected, to make a set of resolutions, promises to ourselves – and more often others – that we will try harder, strive to be better, give over old habits. Many expect us to declare them from the rooftops, hold them out for approval and judgement, only to then have to turn our blushes and apologetic eyes to the world if we fall short of our grand ambitions.

Surely this is why many see their resolutions out till the end of January (mid-February for those with great will-power) and then abandon them as a lost cause for another year. That doesn’t seem the best model for improvement does it?

I’ve outlined a set of objectives and ambitions for Wochi for 2015, and beyond but – call me pedantic – I’m refusing to call them new year resolutions, that terminology just doesn’t sit comfortably. I believe that in order to succeed we need to be flexible, responsive and agile to change. That’s something that is difficult to achieve when you set out a rigid goal at the beginning of the year without knowing what the year holds.

I’ll share these objectives with you in the coming weeks but as a principle I agree with this quote from Henry Moore;

“I think in terms of the day’s resolutions, not the years”.

That is not to say that the objective and ambition will bend with direction of the wind, it’s the activity required to make the ambition a reality that will have to flex as circumstances change and develop. That’s incredibly exciting and inspiring.

The thing that will always remain steadfast is the bedrock of Wochi; the values that it stands for and the purpose for which it was created. Future blogs will continue to explore these values and how they work in action and I’d love your feedback and views on them and how we can continue to develop further through new opportunities.

For now though I’d like to wish you a happy, peaceful and incredibly successful 2015.

“Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

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#LikeAGirl

 

Watching the explosion of the #alsicebucketchallenge (which I’ll come back to in a blog post soon)  has made me ponder on recent social media campaigns. By far the most thought provoking for me has been #LikeAGirl which was launched by Always.

Though not a charity or technically seen as a ‘campaigning’ activity because it was launched by a feminine products brand, it is relevant, powerful and hits a incredibly raw emotional nerve.  

#likeagirl

After contrasting post-puberty females’ and males’ stereotypes associated with the phrase “Like a girl”, with younger girls’ more positive interpretations, the video dissects the socialisation of women to feel weak as a norm. Frightening and illuminating stuff.

Surely it makes you ask, is this how your sisters, daughters, nieces feel?

I think what I found most shocking about this is not only has this messaging, this misogyny, been accepted into the lexicon of society but into the thinking of women and perhaps most frighteningly, girls.

I found myself reflecting on my own use of language and though I consider myself a feminist I know that I too am guilty, occasionally of using such phrases as “You big girl!” as a teasing but undoubtedly derogatory term. I tried to comfort myself that the phrase is short hand for ‘You big girl’s blouse!’ but it is cold comfort…

I have subsequently promised myself and women everywhere never to use any such term as derogatory. I know that as a woman I have a responsibility to support, protect and champion women whenever I can. (Men too, I’m not sexist, but watch the video.) I believe that we all do.

I’m delighted that the empowering message of this video propelled it the number one most viral video the first week it was released. And that between June 26 and July 7 #LikeAGirl garnered 101,679 posts/shares. Now that’s how to do social media #LikeAGirl

I’m also delighted that it struck such an emotional chord; that many girls, women and men mention crying when they watched it. But is that enough? 

Can we all challenge ourselves to make sure we use the phrase ‘like a girl’ in an empowering, positive, encouraging and inspirational manner?

 

The kindness of…

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The popular construct of ‘the kindness of strangers’ was probably made most famous and brought most sharply into relief for us by the damaged, and frankly quite terrified and terrifying character of Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire. (A rather odd juxtaposition is that Kate Adie also used this as a title for one of her autobiographies too…)

However what strikes me as a little odd is that very little is said in popular discourse about the kindness of friends or family.

I’d like to take a moment to redress this.

When I decided to take the momentous- some would say brave, others would say risky- step to set up independently the one thing that overwhelmingly surprised and delighted me was the support and encouragement that was offered to me so generously by my friends. From giving me advice on how to register with Companies House, to helping me decide on a name (more of that to come), to mentoring me on how to approach the strategy of my business, incredible advice on marketing, putting me in touch with potential customers and developing incredible design for my visual identity… Right through to listening to me debate and work answers  out for myself. The list goes on and on. I really want to name names but I’m not sure that my wonderful friends will be comfortable with that.

If I can ask for one thing from you it would be to believe; believe in yourselves, believe in your friends, it is truly priceless and deeply humbling.

Thank you all. You are incredible. I would never be so confident, comfortable or happy taking on this adventure without you. Thanks for your practical help, your support, your belief and your love.